Virtual Seminar – Our Anthropocene Ocean: understanding and intelligently managing the expanding footprint on human activity in our oceans – May 13

 

Doug McCauley, University of California Santa Barbara

Hosted by the Chemical Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "Our Anthropocene Ocean: understanding and intelligently managing the expanding footprint on human activity in our oceans"

MLML Virtual Seminar | May 13th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

About the speaker:

Douglas McCauley is an Associate Professor at the University of California Santa Barbara and the Director of the Benioff Ocean Initiative. Prof. McCauley is a Sloan Research Fellow in the Ocean Sciences and member of World Economic Forum’s Friends of Ocean Action.

Prof. McCauley has degrees in political science and biology from the University of California at Berkeley and a PhD in Biology from Stanford. He conducted postdoctoral research at Stanford, Princeton, and UC Berkeley. 

Prof. McCauley’s research centers upon using advances in marine science, ocean data, and marine technology to promote ocean health. Incorporating new forms of tech into ocean science is an especially important part of the DNA of research in McCauley’s laboratory. 

Research from the McCauley Lab has been published in leading research journals such as Science, Nature, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA and has been featured in the New York Times, BBC, Time, US National Public Radio, and at the World Economic Forum.

 

Virtual Seminar – Geospatial approaches to tropical fish ecology and management – May 6

 

Erik Franklin, University of Hawaiʻi, Mānoa, HIMB

Hosted by the Ichthyology Lab

Presenting: "Geospatial approaches to tropical fish ecology and management"

MLML Virtual Seminar | May 6th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

About the speaker:

Erik C. Franklin is an Associate Research Professor at the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology in the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa who leads a group focused on basic and applied ecological and fisheries research in tropical coastal and marine ecosystems to inform the sustainable management of living resources under a changing climate. His research, teaching, and mentorship involves field, lab, and computational methods including open-circuit and rebreather dive surveys, life history studies, population and stock assessments, MPA design and evaluation, and geospatial, statistical, and simulation modeling for native and invasive marine fishes, corals, invertebrates, and cetaceans with projects in Hawai‘i, American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, Fiji, Indonesia, Palau, and Papua New Guinea. His work has appeared in journals such as Nature Climate Change, Nature Ecology & Evolution, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Fisheries Research, Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Journal of Fish Biology, and Corals Reefs with a wide dissemination of results to the public through regional, national, and international newspaper articles and radio interviews. His work has been funded by the NSF, NOAA, EPA, USGS, and private foundations. Dr. Franklin is faculty in three graduate programs at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa: Marine Biology, Geography and Environment, and Zoology. He also serves as a Member of the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee and a Fellow of the Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research. He earned a Ph.D. from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, an M.S. from the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, and a B.S. from the University of California at San Diego. When not doing the research thing, he is surfing, doing crosswords, or spending time with family. 

 

Virtual Seminar – Interdisciplinary approaches to investigate plankton population dynamics – April 29

 

Darcy Taniguchi, CSU San Marcos

Hosted by the Phycology Lab

Presenting: "Interdisciplinary approaches to investigate plankton population dynamics"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 29th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

About the speaker:

Darcy Taniguchi is an Assistant Professor at CSU San Marcos. Her research explores the characterization and response of marine communities and organisms to varying environmental conditions and interactions. Most of her work focuses on understanding planktonic communities. She received her BA in Mathematics and BS in Biology from UC San Diego and received her MS and PhD in Biological Oceanography from UC San Diego. 

 

Virtual Seminar – A multidisciplinary approach for assessing the vulnerability of species to environmental change – April 22

 

Seth Newsome, University of New Mexico

Hosted by the Vertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "A multidisciplinary approach for assessing the vulnerability of species to environment change"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 22th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

About the speaker:

Seth Newsome is the Associate Director of the University of New Mexico (UNM) Center for Stable Isotopes and an Associate Professor in the UNM Biology Department. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College in 1999, a Ph.D. from the University of California Santa Cruz in 2005 (primary advisor: Paul Koch), and held two postdoctoral positions before arriving at UNM: the first with Marilyn Fogel at the Carnegie Institution for Science and the second with Carlos Martinez del Rio and Dave Williams at the University of Wyoming. Besides science and fixing mass spectrometers, he enjoys mountain biking, rafting, and fly fishing.

 

CANCELLED – Flying for free? Understanding the role of wind variability in albatross foraging energetics – April 15

 

Lesley Thorne, Stony Brook University

Hosted by the Vertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Flying for free? Understanding the role of wind variability in albatross foraging energetics"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 15th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

Dr. Lesley Thorne is an Assistant Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University. Born and raised in Kingston, Ontario in Canada, Lesley received a BSc (Honours) at the University of Guelph and a PhD from Duke University in North Carolina. She has worked in a wide range of marine systems, including the Bay of Fundy, the South Atlantic Bight, the Sargasso Sea, the western Antarctic Peninsula, and the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Lesley is broadly interested in ecological questions in coastal and pelagic systems, and much of her research focuses on understanding links between environmental variability, foraging behavior and population processes, and on elucidating biophysical interactions driving the habitat use and foraging ecology of different marine predators.

 

Virtual Seminar – The chemical ecology of sponges on Caribbean reefs: From metabolites to ecosystems – March 25

 

Joseph Pawlik, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Hosted by the Invertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "The chemical ecology of sponges on Caribbean reefs: From metabolites to ecosystems"

MLML Virtual Seminar | March 25th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

Dr. Joe Pawlik is a Distinguished Professor of Marine Biology in the Department of Biology and Marine Biology at UNCW. He received his BS in 1982 from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and his PhD in Marine Biology in 1988 from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD.  He joined the Department of Biology and Marine Biology at UNCW in 1991, where he teaches undergraduate courses in Invertebrate Zoology and Biodiversity, teaches Introduction to Science as a Profession to graduate students, and directs a research program involving undergrad, MS and PhD students. Joe worked at the US National Science Foundation (NSF) as a Program Officer in the Biological Oceanography Program for 2 years beginning 2003. He and his students and collaborators have authored over 160 publications, primarily on the ecology of sponges on Caribbean coral reefs. Check out a list of his publications here.

 

Virtual Seminar – Drivers of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems – March 18

 

James Cloern, US Geological Survey Menlo Park, CA

Hosted by the Physical and Biological Oceanography Labs

Presenting: "Drivers of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems"

MLML Virtual Seminar | March 18th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

James (Jim) Cloern is a senior scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park, California. His research over four decades addresses comparative ecology and biogeochemistry of estuaries to understand how they respond as ecosystems to climatic-hydrologic variability and human disturbance. His team investigation of San Francisco Bay included studies of primary production, nutrient cycling, algal and zooplankton community dynamics, ecosystem metabolism and food web dynamics, disturbance by introduced species, ecosystem restoration, and past and projected future responses to a changing climate. His career achievements have been recognized with selection as Fellows of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), and as recipient of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution B.H. Ketchum Award, Delta Science Program Brown-Nichols Achievement Award, ASLO Ruth Patrick Award, Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation Odum Lifetime Achievement Award, and Department of Interior's Distinguished Service Award. He is currently an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, a member of the Delta Stewardship Council's Independent Science Board, and editor-in-chief of Limnology and Oceanography Letters.

 

Virtual Seminars – Plugged in: Novel seafloor sensor development on the OOI Cabled Array – March 11

 

Michael Vardaro, University of Washington & SJSU

Hosted by the Geological Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "Plugged in: Novel seafloor sensor development on the OOI Cabled Array"

MLML Virtual Seminar | March 11th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

Mike Vardaro has worked with the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) since 2011; four years as a Project Scientist at Oregon State University focusing on designing, testing, and deploying the Endurance Array off the coast of Oregon and Washington, three years as the Data Manager at Rutgers, working with the Cyberinfrastructure (CI) team on monitoring and evaluating data to create quality-controlled data streams for the OOI user community, and currently as a Research Scientist at the University of Washington, working on the Regional Cabled Array. He is also a lecturer at San Jose State University. Prior to working with the OOI, he designed and deployed photographic and oceanographic instrumentation in the Gulf of Mexico, Northeastern Pacific, and Southeastern Atlantic oceans to study the links between surface productivity, carbon flux, and deep benthic invertebrate populations, and how such systems change over time. He has a BS in Biology from Georgetown University, an MS in Biological Oceanography from Texas A&M, and a Ph.D. in Marine Biology from Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Virtual Seminar – Science without borders: tracking the tropicalization of kelp forests in the Californias – March 4

 

Rodrigo Beas, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California

Hosted by the Phycology Lab

Presenting: "Science without borders: tracking the tropicalization of kelp forests in the Californias"

MLML Virtual Seminar | March 4th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

Predicting changes in structure & function of ecosystems requires large-scale, long-term studies. We integrate kelp forest data from 469 sites/373 species spanning Alaska, USA, to Baja California, Mexico. Results revealed changes in community structure were most evident within the southern and north-central ecoregions, and forecast a poleward shift in the abundance of habitat-forming groups. All this was only possible with a sweeping display of international coordination and cooperation of a team of scientists and countless volunteers from 14 different organizations joining forces to document the northward migration of kelp forests due to warming waters. This is an excellent example of collaboration between researchers, communities, and civil society organizations in the USA and Mexico to understand how climate change will impact the kelp forest and therefore fisheries and coastal communities in the next 30 years.

 

About the speaker:

Rodrigo Beas-Luna is an Associate Professor at Facultad de Ciencias Marina, UABC. He is a marine ecologist-oceanographer, who combines field observation, lab work and quantitative tools to better understand the functioning of energy transfer among trophic levels and ecosystem responses to different environmental conditions. 

 

Dr. Rodrigo Beas Presents: “Science without borders: tracking the tropicalization of kelp forests in the Calirfornias”

Virtual Seminar – Spatial dynamics of coastal ecosystems and their resilience to disturbance, fishing and climate change – February 25th

 

Andrew Rassweiler, Florida State University

Hosted by the Ichthyology Lab

Presenting: "Spatial dynamics of coastal ecosystems and their resilience to disturbance, fishing and climate change"

MLML Virtual Seminar | February 25th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

 

 

 

Dr. Andrew Rassweiler is an Assistant Professor in the department of Biological Science at Florida State University. He is an applied marine ecologist who studies coastal environments with an emphasis on resilience, abrupt ecological state change and the spatial management of marine resources. He works in kelp forest, seagrass and coral reef ecosystems using a mix of empirical and theoretical approaches. His work is highly interdisciplinary and features collaboration with economists and anthropologists to better understand feedbacks between ecological and human components of nearshore marine systems. 

Check out his website here: http://rassweiler-lab.com/