Seminar – Climate-resilient fisheries management in the California Current – September 8th

 

Dr. Chris Free, UC Santa Barbara

Hosted by the Ichthyology Lab

Presenting: "Climate-resilient fisheries management in the California Current"

MLML Virtual Seminar | September 8th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Chris is Research Faculty at the Bren School at University of California, Santa Barbara. He has a BA in Conservation Biology from Middlebury College and a PhD in Oceanography from Rutgers University. His research is focused on understanding the impacts of climate change on marine fisheries and on designing and testing management strategies that are adaptive to these impacts. He is also interested in bycatch avoidance, harmful algal blooms, and the role of seafood in human nutrition.

Dr. Chris Free Presents: Climate-resilient fisheries management in the California Current

Virtual seminar – The role of biogenic habitat in controlling local seawater chemistry – September 1st

 

Dr. Aaron Ninakawa, University of Washington: Friday Harbor

Hosted by Scientific Diving

Presenting: "The role of biogenic habitat in controlling local seawater chemistry"

MLML Virtual Seminar | September 1st, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Aaron is an NSF postdoctoral fellow working at the University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories and is interested in understanding how aquatic organisms interact with their chemical environment. He earned a B.S. in Biology and a B.A in Chemistry from Cal State Fullerton before starting a Ph.D. in Ecology at the UC Davis Bodega Marine Lab. His research focuses on understanding how habitat forming species alter chemistry, the consequences of those alterations for associated species, and how those interactions change given natural and human driven variability in background water chemistry.

Virtual seminar – Wave-driven changes in beach sand levels – August 25th

 

Dr. Bonnie Ludka, California State Polytechnic University: Humboldt

Hosted by the Physical Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "Wave-driven changes in beach sand levels"

MLML Virtual Seminar | August 25th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Dr. Ludka is a coastal scientist with a background that spans physics, oceanography, geology, data science and engineering. They are interested in how coastal physical processes interact with environmental management and ecological functioning, on time scales of storms to decades. Her team uses fieldwork, data analysis and modeling to help build more resilient coasts. Dr. Ludka has a B.S. in Physics from James Madison University and a Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She has held postdoctoral positions at the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps and in the Coastal Engineering Department at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. They also were a California Sea Grant fellow at the California Coastal Commission. Now she is an assistant professor in the Geology Department at San Jose State.

Dr. Bonnie Ludka Presents: Wave-driven changes in beach sand levels

Virtual Seminar – Using complementary approaches to dive into the gray seal-fisheries conundrum on Cape Cod – April 28th

 

Keith Hernandez, University of California Santa Cruz

Hosted by the Vertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Using complementary approaches to dive into the gray seal-fisheries conundrum on Cape Cod"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 28th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Dr. Keith Hernandez is a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and is an MLML Alumni. He is a marine mammal ecologist, and studies foraging ecology, behavior and demography.

Dr. Keith Hernandez Presents: Using complementary approaches to dive into the gray seal-fisheries conundrum on Cape Cod

Virtual Seminar – Edible particles, inedible particles, and the development of the feeding larvae of marine invertebrates – April 21st

 

Bruno Pernet, California State University Long Beach

Hosted by the Invertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Edible particles, inedible particles, and the development of the feeding larvae of marine invertebrates"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 21st, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Bruno Pernet is a Professor of Biological Sciences at CSU Long Beach, where he studies the development, functional morphology, and evolution of the larvae of marine invertebrates. He earned a B.A. in Biology from UC Santa Cruz, then a Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Washington. After postdoctoral research at the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, Florida, he spent several years teaching and doing research at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology and the Friday Harbor Marine Laboratories before starting his position at CSU Long Beach.

Virtual Seminar – The impact of microbial production of organic ligands on the cycling of iron in seawater – April 14th

 

Randie Bundy, University of Washington

Hosted by the Chemical Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "The impact of microbial production of organic ligands on the cycling of iron in seawater"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 14th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Randie studies trace metal biogeochemistry in seawater, with a focus on how organic compounds impact their global cycling. Her research has taken her on many research cruises, ranging from the tropics to the poles. She did her PhD at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, followed by her postdoc at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. She is now an Assistant Professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. In her free time she is an avid surfer, loves outdoor activities of any kind, and reading.

Dr. Randie Bundy Presents: The impact of microbial production of organic ligands on the cycling of iron in seawater

Virtual Seminar – Revealing the hidden diversity, abundance, and feeding interactions at the base of aquatic food webs – April 7th

 

Michelle Jungbluth, San Francisco State University

Hosted by the Biological Oceanography lab

Presenting: "Revealing the hidden diversity, abundance, and feeding interactions at the base of aquatic food webs"

MLML Virtual Seminar | April 7th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Dr. Michelle Jungbluth is currently a Researcher at the San Francisco State University's Estuary and Ocean Science Center. She has a Bachelor's Degree in Biology from the University of Wisconsin Madison, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. After completing her Ph.D. she began exploring the complexities of food webs and wetland ecology in the San Francisco Estuary in the lab of Dr. Wim Kimmerer and continues there to this day.She is an ecologist, naturalist, oceanographer and marine biologist interested in the phenomena occurring at the base of aquatic food webs. In her career as a scientist she has focused on studies involving mainly zooplankton - the animals that "drift" in the sea. But they aren't just passive particles, they have unique behaviors that make them very interesting and important members of ecosystems. Her technical expertise includes characterizing life in marine and estuarine ecosystems through DNA barcoding, quantitative PCR-based studies of animal life history and food web connections, and next-generation DNA sequencing. She has also dabbled in DNA barcoding of deep-sea larval invertebrates, which is a location where we know almost nothing about organism diversity and even less about larval ecology.

Dr. Michelle Jungbluth Presents: Revealing the hidden diversity, abundance, and feeding interactions at the base of aquatic food webs

Virtual Seminar – Phytoplankton compositional shifts as indicators of oceanographic change in Central California – March 17th

 

Alexis Pasulka, California Polytechnic State University SLO

Hosted by the Biological Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "Phytoplankton compositional shifts as indicators of oceanographic change in Central California"

MLML Virtual Seminar | March 17th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Alexis Pasulka is an Assistant Professor at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. Her research explores a diversity of questions related to the composition, distribution, and interactions of marine microorganisms. By using environmental gradients over time or space, she aims to can gain insight into how organisms at base of the food web might respond to a changing climate. Alexis’ research integrates field and lab-based studies as well as multiple complimentary approaches (e.g., microscopy, molecular, and geochemical techniques). She received her BS in Biology from Arizona State University and her PhD in Biological Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Virtual Seminar – The influence of oceanographic and environmental features on plankton and seabird communities in the North Pacific- March 10th

 

Caitie Kroeger, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories/Farallon Institute

Hosted by the Vertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "The influence of oceanographic and environmental features on plankton and seabird communities in the North Pacific"

MLML Virtual Seminar | March 10th, 2022 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Caitie’s research is centered on understanding the direct and indirect effects of oceanic and climatological forcing on the energy balance, movement patterns, and distributions of marine organisms. She earned her Ph.D. in Ocean Science from the University of California Santa Cruz, where she studied the ecophysiology of sub-Antarctic albatrosses and co-founded a science communication group. She then joined the Farallon Institute as a postdoctoral researcher, where she explored the effects of marine mesoscale eddies on structuring plankton and seabird communities and used spatial-temporal models to map seabird distributions for oil-spill risk assessment. She recently joined MLML as a postdoctoral researcher in the Vertebrate Ecology Lab where she’s investigating the foraging ecology and habitat use of emperor penguins.