Virtual Seminar – Fire + Flood = Beach: Observations of Coastal Change in Big Sur, California – September 23rd

 

Jonathan Warrick, USGS - United States Geological Survey

Hosted by the Physical Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "Fire + Flood = Beach: Observations of Coastal Change in Big Sur, California"

MLML Virtual Seminar | September 23rd, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

About the speaker:

Dr. Jonathan Warrick is a Research Geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Santa Cruz, California, where he studies the movement of sediment in rivers and in the sea.  Jon has led efforts to characterize the outcomes of the world’s largest dam removal project on the Elwha River, and his work has been featured in multiple media outlets, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Outside Magazine, and the nationally broadcast CBS Evening News.  Jon received a Ph.D. in Marine Science from the UCSB in 2002 and has authored or co-authored over 90 peer reviewed science articles, reports and book chapters and has contributed to or presented over 150 scientific presentations and guest lectures.

Virtual Seminar – Growing Up on Ice: Early Development in Weddell Seal Pups – September 30

 

Heather Liwanag, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Hosted by the Vertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Growing Up on Ice: Early Development in Weddell Seal Pups"

MLML Virtual Seminar | September 30th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

About the speaker:

Heather Liwanag is an Associate Professor of Biology at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. She earned a B.S. in Biology from the University of California, San Diego and a Ph.D. in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is interested in the physiological adaptations of animals to their environment, and the evolutionary processes involved in those adaptations. Much of her research has focused on thermoregulation (the regulation of body temperature) and energetics (metabolic rates) in vertebrate animals, including seals, sea lions, and even lizards. She has been fortunate to work with an amazing group of people (Team B-030) on this recent project, studying the early development of Weddell seal pups in Antarctica.

Virtual Seminar – From Cellular Omics to Phenomics: The Role of Sirtuins in the Cellular Stress Response – October 21

 

Lars Tomanek, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Hosted by the Invertebrate Zoology Lab

Presenting: "From Cellular Omics to Phenomics: The Role of Sirtuins in the Cellular Stress Response"

MLML Virtual Seminar | October 21st, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Talk synopsis:

Sirtuins are regulators of the proteome by modifying metabolic enzymes, chaperones and anti-oxidative stress proteins to improve the response of organisms to several environmental stressors.  We tested their role in two marine mussel species that vary in their response to heat and salinity stress.  A key question for integrative biology is if these molecular differences affect phenotypes at higher levels of organismal organization.  We tested this assumption while simultaneously monitoring the molecular changes accompanying changes in ciliary activity, particle velocity of the gill, a feeding organ in mussels, and whole organism filtration rates.  The presentation will discuss the challenges of doing integrative biology.

 

Virtual Seminar – Losing their lifeline? Mussel attachment in dynamic coastal environments- October 28

 

Emily Carrington, University of Washington, Seattle

Hosted by the Invertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Losing their lifeline? Mussel attachment in dynamic coastal environments"

MLML Virtual Seminar | October 28th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

Mussels are well-known ecosystem engineers, often dominating temperate wave-swept shores worldwide.  They are also important aquaculture species and a “biofouling” nuisance to many maritime industries. Disturbance to mussel populations, such as dislodgment due to increased flow forces and/or weakened attachment, therefore has important ecological and economic ramifications.  Mussels attach securely to hard substrates such as rock, aquaculture rope and ship hulls by molding individual collagen-like tethers called byssal threads.  This seminar will describe some of our controlled laboratory experiments on the effects of ocean acidification (OA), ocean warming (OW) and hypoxia on byssal thread strength, as well as our field observations of farmed mussel populations. Our ecomechanical framework provides a valuable tool for predicting the responses of mussels, and their dependent coastal communities, to current and future climate scenarios.

About the speaker:

Emily Carrington is Professor of Biology at the University of Washington, where she leads a marine biomechanics research group based in Seattle and the Friday Harbor Laboratories in the San Juan Islands.  She grew up in Michigan and North Carolina, where she developed a fascination with industrial assembly lines and coastal waves and currents. Her research on the mechanical design of marine invertebrates and macroalgae, especially those that thrive in the wave-swept rocky shores began on the shores of Monterey Bay. Her work draws upon the fields of engineering, biology and oceanography to develop a mechanistic understanding of how coastal organisms will fare in changing ocean climates.

Virtual Seminar – Flying for free? Understanding the role of wind variability in albatross foraging energetics – November 4

 

Lesley Thorne, Stony Brook University

Hosted by the Vertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Flying for free? Understanding the role of wind variability in albatross foraging energetics"

MLML Virtual Seminar | November 4th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

About the speaker:

Dr. Lesley Thorne is an Assistant Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University. Born and raised in Kingston, Ontario in Canada, Lesley received a BSc (Honours) at the University of Guelph and a PhD from Duke University in North Carolina. She has worked in a wide range of marine systems, including the Bay of Fundy, the South Atlantic Bight, the Sargasso Sea, the western Antarctic Peninsula, and the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Lesley is broadly interested in ecological questions in coastal and pelagic systems, and much of her research focuses on understanding links between environmental variability, foraging behavior and population processes, and on elucidating biophysical interactions driving the habitat use and foraging ecology of different marine predators.

Virtual Seminar – Marine Science for Social Justice – November 18

 

Katy Seto, University of California Santa Cruz

Hosted by the Invertebrate Ecology Lab

Presenting: "Marine Science for Social Justice"

MLML Virtual Seminar | November 18th, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

About the speaker:

Katy Seto is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research lies at the intersection of political ecology, governance theory, and sustainability science, and investigates the equity, sustainability, and governance of marine and coastal systems. Currently, her research focuses on ecology and governance of marine systems, seafood within local and global food systems, and issues of maritime security and globalization.

Virtual Seminar – The Impacts of Submesoscale Currents on Marine Life From Phytoplankton to White Sharks – December 2

 

Leif Thomas, Stanford University

Hosted by the Biological Oceanography Lab

Presenting: "The Impacts of Submesoscale Currents on Marine Life From Phytoplankton to White Sharks"

MLML Virtual Seminar | December 2nd, 2021 at 4pm

Watch the Live Stream here or here

About the speaker:

Dr. Leif N. Thomas is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. Thomas received a PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Washington, and was an Assistant Scientist at WHOI before joining the faculty at Stanford.  His research aims to understand the dynamics of submesoscale currents, highly energetic, time-variable flows that are associated with ocean fronts and eddies. These flows are ubiquitous in the upper ocean and strongly shape how water is exchanged between the sea surface and the deep, with implications for marine life, the dispersal of tracers, and the carbon and energy budgets of the ocean. Thomas’ research group at Stanford uses theory, computer modeling, and field observations to characterize the complex physics of submesoscale currents and assess their global-scale impacts on the ocean and climate.